Home » NEW PAGE UNLOCKED: DISCOVER ALL JOHN FLORIO’S BOOKS

NEW PAGE UNLOCKED: DISCOVER ALL JOHN FLORIO’S BOOKS

by Resolute John Florio

A new page has been unlocked on Resolutejohnflorio.com. Now you can discover all the books available about John Florio: biographies, historical fictions, plays, essays, and much more.

Do you want to know more about John Florio’s life?

BIOGRAPHIES & HISTORICAL FICTIONS

In “Books about John Florio” you can find many biographies about him. From the first biography written by Frances Yates “John Florio: the life of an Italian in Shakespeare’s England” to the historical fiction written by Anne Cuneo, a Swiss journalist, novelist, theatre and film director and screenwriter, who wrote “Un monde de mots, John Florio traducteur, lexicographe, pédagogue, homme de lettres”.

FLORIO, THE CREATIVE TRANSLATOR

You can also have access to many critical essays and analysis of Florio’s works: from “Translation, an Elizabethan art” by Matthiessen that investigates Florio’s dramatic style in his translation of Montaigne’s Essays to “The first English translation of the Decameron” by Wright Herbert Gladstone that examines the anonymous translation of Boccaccio’s masterpiece and suggests John Florio is the most likely translator of the work.

PLAYS & SHAKESPEARE

If you prefer to read plays “Shakespeare in Fulham” by Chaunes, pseudonym of the British physicist and educator Jean-Patrick Connerade, is a play set in London, with Ben Jonson, Walsingham, and John Florio as the man behind the plays of Shakespeare.

If you’re interested in the vexed question of John Florio and Shakespeare’s relationship, Tassinari’s “John Florio: the man who was Shakespeare” is a major study on Florio’s cultural achievements and suggests Florio as the most likely contender to the Shakespeare’s throne.

Gerevini’s “William Shakespeare, ovvero John Florio, un fiorentino alla conquista del mondo” is a book that, similar to Tassinari, analyses John Florio in relationship to Shakespeare, but suggesting that he collaborated with the man from Stratford and was the “Abolute Iohannes Factotum” mentioned in Thomas Nashe and Robert Greene’s attacks.

The more recent “Shakespeare’s library: unlocking the greatest mystery in literature” by Stuart Kells is an attempt to reconstruct the Bard’s library and what books the Bard might have owned, and examining the Shakespeare authorship question, placing John Florio as the editor, with Ben Jonson, of Shakespeare’s plays.

FLORIO, THE LEXICOGRAPHER

If you want to learn more about the importance of John Florio’s contribution to the development of English language, John Gallagher’s book “Learning languages in Early Modern England” argues that the history of Early modern England is a multilingual one, giving John Florio an important role as apostle of the italian language and culture in England. Similarly, “The Italian encounter with Tudor England: a cultural politics of translation” by Michael Wyatt analyses the impact of Italian’s cultural patrimony to the English nation, and explores John Florio’s brilliant career as lexicographer, translator and language teacher.

What genre of Florio book fits you the most? Choose your book, and enjoy your reading!

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